COVID-19 and mental health

Test 2 CiteIt

I am in Canada currently. The following is on a site offering resources in Canada.

It’s important to be kind to yourself. This is an anxious and stressful time for everyone, and it’s okay if you feel more anxious than usual, and it’s okay to take time for yourself to manage your mental health. You are doing the best you can in a time when simply turning on the news can feel overwhelming.

https://cmha.bc.ca/news/managing-anxiety-covid-19/

 

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Testing Cite-it on article about coronavirus and mental health

Today I tested Tim Langeman’s cite-it plug-in for my blog.

I am going to quote from an article I read:

When the World Health Organization released advice on protecting your mental health during the coronavirus outbreak, it was broadly welcomed.

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‘I have dark thoughts about my children’s autism’

Some parents of disabled children can appear unwaveringly positive. But one mother says her children’s autism has left her with “dark thoughts” and she wishes their impairments would disappear.

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A Glimpse Into My Son’s Magnificent Mind (who has autism)

Max’s autism diagnosis three years ago gave me an unspeakable sense of relief. When a friend asked me later that day how I was feeling, I could only describe it in this way: “I feel empty and full at the same time.”

After years of being dismissed as hysterical and overprotective, I welcomed the diagnosis as overdue validation. To be seen and heard is always humanizing, and as a woman in the world, I have confronted my own invisibility more times than I wish to recall. The diagnosis, in my mind, represented progress.

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/07/10/style/modern-love-glimpse-into-autistic-sons-magnificent-mind.html?action=click&module=Editors%20Picks&pgtype=Homepage

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What outdoor space tells us about inequality

Of course, trying to increase access to outdoor space has been a goal of cities way before Covid-19 struck. But the conversation has taken on greater intensity since the pandemic has exposed just how unequal access can be. It’s not yet been possible to quantify the mental-health toll of long weeks of lockdown, and any correlation with access to outdoor space. But we do know that isolation is bad for everyone’s mental health, and that people who lost incomes or had low incomes to begin with experienced more stress. “Covid continues to spotlight where these inequities are and what they look like,” says Burrowes.

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What we can learn from ‘untranslatable’ illnesses

From an enigmatic rage disorder to a sickness of overthinking, there are some mental illnesses you only get in certain cultures. Why? And what can they teach us?

“DO NOT FEAR KORO,” screamed the headline in the Straits Times newspaper on November 7, 1967. In the preceding days, a peculiar phenomenon had swept across Singapore. Thousands of men had spontaneously become convinced that their penises were shrinking away – and that the loss would eventually kill them.

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How a bench and a team of grandmothers can tackle depression

Many of the New York counsellors have successfully overcome addictions and other life challenges themselves. “We’re committed to having folks with lived experiences, who can speak the language of recovery and of dealing with addiction,” White says. “Before you know it, you’re not on a bench, you’re just inside of a warm conversation with someone who cares and understands.”

The New York City benches – which are bright orange – were piloted in 2016 and launched in mid-2017, attracting some 30,000 visitors during their first year. The city so far has three permanent benches in the Bronx, Brooklyn and Harlem, and the programme hosts pop-ups at festivals, churches, food pantries, parks and more. Friendship Bench counsellors also make themselves available immediately following community tragedies, including a recent suicide completed in public in East Harlem.

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The world’s most accessible stress reliever – singing

When we sing, large parts of our brain “light up” with activity, says Sarah Wilson, a clinical neuropsychologist and head of the School of Psychological Sciences at the University of Melbourne. She led a study which looked at how the brain reacts when we sing by giving volunteers of varying vocal ability MRI scans as they warbled.

“There is a singing network in the brain [which is] quite broadly distributed,” Wilson says. When we speak, the hemisphere of the brain dealing with language lights up, as we might expect. When we sing, however, both sides of the brain spark into life.

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CDC Researchers: Over 5 Million US Adults Have Autism

For the first time ever, researchers at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention are estimating the number of American adults who have autism.

More than 5.4 million people in the U.S. — or 1 in 45 — over age 18 are on the spectrum, according to findings published online this week in the Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders.

 

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Why coronavirus may make the world more accessible

For many people with disabilities, options like remote working have been needed for years. Workplaces around the world have now made this shift. Are there other ways the world could become more accessible, too?

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